A Deeper Look at Public Goods

What do we mean by “nonexcludable” and “nonrival” when talking about public goods? Public goods challenge markets because it’s difficult to charge non-payers and it

What do we mean by “nonexcludable” and “nonrival” when talking about public goods? Public goods challenge markets because it’s difficult to charge non-payers and it’s inefficient to exclude anyone — so, how do we produce them? Public goods provide an argument for taxation and government provision. But how do we know which public goods should be provided? In this video we cover the free-rider problem and the forced-rider problem in regards to public goods. We also discuss examples of the four different categories of goods which will be covered in future videos: private goods, commons resources, club goods, and public goods.

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Ah. I see. In the following video, wi-fi bandwidth is called nonrival, "assuming no congestion". Yosemite is nonrival if we likewise assume no congestion.

Exactly right!

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