What happened to the cleanliness of your clothes after the U.S. Department of Energy issued new washing machine requirements? The requirements — which require

What happened to the cleanliness of your clothes after the U.S. Department of Energy issued new washing machine requirements? The requirements — which require washers to use 20% less energy — mean that washers actually clean clothes less than they used to. Is “command and control" an efficient way to achieve the desired outcome (which is less pollution)? Rather than a standard requirement, such as the Department of Energy issued, a tax on electricity would provide users with greater flexibility in their washing—and would prompt people to purchase machines that use energy more efficiently and keep their clothes clean.

Are there times when a command and control solution to a problem makes the most sense? We look at the eradication of smallpox as one example. 

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I also have same question. When there are only few countries where people eat whale and the government is efficient (low cost of survillance and monitoring of compliance), a heavy tax can stop (decrease) whaling. The only support to Command and control is that if Whale are at a brink of extinction and if government is not efficient and monitoring machanism is weak.

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we should stop eating whale meat to save animal life.

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